William McKean, Descendants

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Descendants of William McKeen

Generation No. 1

1.  WILLIAM3 MCKEEN  (JAMES2, WILLIAM1) was born Abt. 1704.  He married SUSANNAH MCCAIN.

 Children of WILLIAM MCKEEN and SUSANNAH MCCAIN are:
2. i. JAMES4 MCKEEN.
 ii. JOHN MCKEEN.
 iii. THOMAS MCKEEN.
3. iv. WILLIAM MCKEEN, d. 08 November 1769.
 v. BARBARA MCKEEN.
 vi. MARGARET MCKEEN.

Generation No. 2

2.  JAMES4 MCKEEN (WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1).

Notes for JAMES MCKEEN:
Born in Londonderry, Ireland.

 Child of JAMES MCKEEN is:
4. i. WILLIAM5 MCKEEN.

3.  WILLIAM4 MCKEEN (WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1) died 08 November 1769.  He married (1) ANN LOGAN.  He married (2) LETITIA FINNEY.

Notes for WILLIAM MCKEEN:
Emigrated to Pennsylvania in his early teens.  For more information see notes for son Thomas, signer of the Declaration of Independence

'History of Chester Co., PA', says that Thomas, the signer's
father, William, was born in 1707.

 Children of WILLIAM MCKEEN and LETITIA FINNEY are:
5. i. DOROTHEA5 MCKEEN.
6. ii. WILLIAM MCKEEN.
 iii. ROBERT MCKEEN, m. ? ANTILL.
7. iv. THOMAS MCKEEN, b. 19 March 1733/34, New London,  Pennsylvania; d. 24 June 1817, Philadelphia, Penn. - bur.  in cemetery - Presbyterian church - Philadelphia.
 

Generation No. 3

4.  WILLIAM5 MCKEEN (JAMES4, WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1).  He married MARGARET WILSON.

 Children of WILLIAM MCKEEN and MARGARET WILSON are:
 i. COLONEL THOMAS6 MCKEEN, b. 17 August 1763; m. ELIZABETH LONG.
 ii. JAMES MCKEEN.

5.  DOROTHEA5 MCKEEN (WILLIAM4, WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1).  She married JOHN THOMPSON.

 Child of DOROTHEA MCKEEN and JOHN THOMPSON is:
 i. THOMAS MCKEEN6 THOMPSON.

6.  WILLIAM5 MCKEEN (WILLIAM4, WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1).  He married MARY PETERSON, daughter of ADAM PETERSON.

 Children of WILLIAM MCKEEN and MARY PETERSON are:
 i. THOMAS B.6 MCKEEN.
 ii. LETITIA MCKEEN.

7.  THOMAS5 MCKEEN (WILLIAM4, WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1) was born 19 March 1733/34 in New London,  Pennsylvania, and died 24 June 1817 in Philadelphia, Penn. - bur.  in cemetery - Presbyterian church - Philadelphia.  He married (1) SARAH ARMITAGE.  He married (2) MARY BORDEN 21 July 1763, daughter of JOSEPH BORDEN and ELIZABETH ROGERS.

Notes for THOMAS MCKEEN:
From Ruby Henderson's Notes:

Thomas McKeen of Delaware--

A tall dignified lawyer, Thomas McKeen was one of the most patriotic & hardest working of the Founding Fathers, holding public office for more than fifty years in the period before, during, and after the Revolutionary War.  He was the only delegate to the First Continental Congress of 1774 who continued to serve regularly until the peace treaty with Great Britain was approved in 1783.  During this time he signed the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation and in 1781 he was elected president of the Congress.  He was Chief Justice of Pa for 22 years and the governor for nine years.

Thomas was born 19 March 1734 in New London, Pa.  He was the son of William McKeen, who had emigrated to Pa from Ireland in his teens.  Thomas was tutored in academic subjects by Rev Francis Allison and then became a student of Law under the tutelage of David Finney, a relative of his mothers.  When he was twenty, McKeen began practicing law in Pa and Dela.

McKeen began his long public career at the age of 22 being appointed in 1756 as deputy attorney general to handle the prosecution of cases in Sussex County, Dela.  In 1757, he was appointed clerk of the lower house of Delaware legislature, an office he held for 2 years.  In 1762, he was elected as a member of the lower house of the legislature from Newcastle County, Delaware and he continued to win elections as the representative of this county for 17 years, finally declining to serve any longer in 1779.

The same year that he was first elected to the Delaware legislature, the 28 year old married Mary Borden, eldest daughter of Joseph Borden of Bordentown, N. J.  By this marriage he became the brother-in-law of Francis Hopkinson who later became one of his fellow signers of the Declaration.  McKeen and his wife had six children before her death in 1773.  The next year he re-married.  This time to Sarah Armitage of Newcastle, Delaware and the second marriage resulted in five more children.

In 1765, McKeen was elected by the Delaware legislature as one of the delegates to the Stamp Act Congress in N.Y.  At the outset of this meeting, McKeen suggested and the Congress adopted as a form of procedure that each colony should have one vote on each measure to come before it.  This was the basis for the equal voice of each colony or state that was later followed in the Continential Congress.  The Congress of the Confederation and in the Senate under U.S. Constitution.  The Congress agreed on a declaration of rights that had been written by John Dickinson, a petition to the king, and memorials to the British parliament, all calling for repeal of the Stamp Act.  At the close of the Congress on Oct 24, several members refused to sign the proceedings, when McKeen pressed Ruggles to explain his reluctance to sign, the president said that "it was against his conscience."  At this McKeen made such a sarcastic speech on the subject of "conscience" that Ruggles challenged him to a duel in front of the Congress, but Ruggles left N.Y. for Boston before dawn the next day without carrying out the duel.

McKeen began his career as a justice in 1765 when he was appointed as a justice of the peace and to the court of common pleas for Newcastle county.  His court is believed to be the first in the colonies that ordered its officers to ignore the British Stamp Act and to use unstamped paper for their documents.  In 1772 and 1773 he was elected speaker of the House of Representatives in the Delaware legislature.

In 1774 the Delaware legislature elected McKeen as one of its delegates to the first Continential Congress and he continued to be re-elected for the next nine years.  Meanwhile, McKeen moved to Philadephia and began to take an active part in the patriotic movement in the state.  In June 1776, he was president of a provincial convention held at Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia that recommended that the Continential Congress adopt a Declaration of Independence.  He also had been elected colonel of a militia regiment and chairman of the committee of safety of Pa.

McKeen was a member of the committee that met to consider the resolution for independence July 1, 1776.  He favored independence.

A few days after the Declaration had been adopted, McKeen marched at the head of his battalion of militia to Perth Amboy, N.J. for the support of Gen George Washington's army.  McKeen was called to Dover, Delaware immediately after his tour of duty, as a member of a convention to adopt a constitution for Delaware.  He stayed up all night to write the document.  In the morning at 10 o'clock it was unanimously adopted.  He became speaker of the Delaware House under the new constitution.

McKeen was not present on 2 Aug 1776 when the Declaration was signed by most of the delegates to the Second Continential Congress.  It is not known exactly when he did sign it, but he apparently was the last man to do so, sometime in 1781, after it had been engrossed on parchment.

On 28 July 1777, he was appointed chief Justice of Pa., a position he occupied for 22 years.

McKeen said he had his full share of the anxieties, cares, and troubles of the Revolutionary War.  He was obliged to act as president of Delaware State and Chief Justice of Pa.  General Howe had just landed at the head of the Elk River when he undertook to discharge these two duties.  The consequence was to be hunted like a fox by the enemy and envied by those who ought to have been his friends. He was compelled to remove his family five times in a few months and at last fixed them in a log house on the banks of the Susquehanna, more than a 100 miles away.  He was forced to move them again on account of the incursions of the Indians.

McKeen became the first man to be elected President of the Congress under Articles of Confederation on 10 July 1781.

He was not a member of the Constitutional Convention that wrote the U.S. Constitution.

At age of 65, he was elected governor of Pa.

At age of 74, he retired to private life in 1808.  He was 83 years old when he died in Philadelphia on 24 June 1817.  His body was interred in the cemetery of Presbyterian church in Philadelphia.

McKean, Thomas (1734-1817) Born in New London, Pa., March 19, 1734. Delegate to Continental Congress from Delaware, 1774; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776, 1776; member of Delaware state legislature, 1776; signer, Articles of Confederation, 1777; justice of Pennsylvania state supreme court, 1777; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1799-1808. Died June 24, 1817. Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa. McKean County, Pa. is named for him.

Here, from Peggy Goehring, is Thomas's last will and testament:
Delivered-To: jsp@dnai.com
Date: Sun, 01 Feb 1998 11:50:26 -0600
From: Dave & Peggy Goehring <drgoeh@swbell.net>
Reply-To: drgoeh@swbell.net
X-Mailer: Mozilla 3.0 (Win95; U)
Subject: Thomas McKean Will

Hi group,
For those of you who may be intested, I have included the Will of Thomas
McKean (TS).  I have a microfilmed copy of a hand written version that
is very, very hard to read.  I also have a typed copy that has small
letters and is sort of blurry.  I have retyped this in Microsoft Word
and have copied it into this message.  I wrote it just as it was.  There
are some mispellings, etc.  There are a lot of family names included in
it and the location of the land he owned, which was a lot.  I got these
copies from the Court House in Beaver Co., PA.  It is strange that it
was not filed there until 1915, one hundred years after the will was
written.

Peggy
 
 

                                     LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT.
                                          CERTIFIED COPY.
THOMAS McKEAN--------------------------------LATE
OF---------------------------------PHILADELPHIA
                                   REGISTERED FEBRUARY 27, 1915

 
 Be it remembered that I, Thomas McKean of the City of Philadelphia in
the state of Pennsylvania having passed my eightieth year and being in
good health & of perfect mind memory and understanding do, this
thirteenth day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight
hundred and fourteen and of the independence of the United States of
America the thirty ninth, make this my last Will and Testament in manner
following.
 I desire that my body may be buried in the most convenient cemetery or
burying ground, at the discretion of my executors, that my funeral may
be decent but not expensive; and that none of my family wear any
mourning for me unless such as was practised  by the Congress during the
war between the United States and Great Britain as I have survived the
usual term of human existence as for my temporal estate & property I
give devise and bequeath the same in manner & form following.
 First I give devise & bequeath to my wife Sarah her selection or choice
of my household furniture to the value of one thousand dollars on the
appraisement and six hundred dollars a year during her natural life, to
be paid to her in half yearly payments on the tenth day of January and
the tenth day of July the first payment to be made on the first of said
days that shall occur next after my decease.  I further devise unto my
said wife my house and log, with the appurtenances, is the village of
Holmesburgh during her natural life, which shall be in lieu and full
satisfaction of  her dower and of all claims & demands against my estate
real and personal and whereas I have at different times advanced to each
of my children portions of my Property amounting in the whole to about
forty thousand dollars, I do hereby remit, release and discharge them
severally from the same forever.  Also I give and devise to my son
Joseph Borden McKean my mansion house in the City of Philadelphia and
all the land thereto adjoining bounded on Third Street, Union & Pine
streets with the appurtenances, thereunto belonging, and a rent charge
of eight dollars a year from a house & lot of Mrs. Mary Rogers, having
been originally part of the premises hereby devised, to hold to the said
Joseph B. McKean his heirs & assigns forever; subject to the rent charge
due to the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, and also to John
Grardom, and charged with three hundred dollars a year, being a moiety
of the annual sum bequeathed to my wife during her life in lieu of dower
to be paid in half yearly payments as aforesaid.  I do further give &
bequeath to my said son my share in the Union Library of Philadelphia my
picture in the Hall of my mansion house, also my Gold headed cane, my
steel seal having my coat of arms cut thereon, my family Bible with a
cover thereon wrought by his mother and my notes of cases in law,
letters and manuscripts whatsoever.  Also I give and devise to my grand
daughter Mary McKean, only child of my second son Robert McKean,
deceased all that house & lot in Holmesburgh in the county of
Philidelphia which I purchased of Doctor Thomas Jones with the
appurtenances; to hold to the said Mary, her heirs & assigns forever,
subject to the life estate devised to my wife, but free & exempt from
all lieus & incumbrances whatsoever.  Also I give, devise & bequeath
unto Andrew Petit, who intermarried with my Daughter Elizabeth deceased,
and by her had born four sons & daughters, in trust for my said grand
children, all those eleven tracts of land, lying contigous to each
other, situate on Brush creek or run in Beaver county, patented in my
name and containing two thousand two hundred acres, besides the
allowance of six per centum for roads & c. to have and to hold to him &
his heirs in trust for his said children and their heirs & assigns
forever, as tenants in common.
 I do further give & devise to my said son in law the following rents
charge on ground rents reserved out of the lots of land situate on Sixth
street in the City of Philadelphia between spruce street & the
Pottersfield, to wit, a lot now held by Henry C. Brolasky annually
ninety two dollars another by Robert Pullen, a corner lot of sixth &
Locust streets one hundred & fourteen dollars & seventeen cents; another
by Jonathan Trusty thirty six dollars & thirty two cents; another by the
devises or heirs of  Stephen Laws thirty four dollars & fifty eight
cents and another by Patrick Delany thirty four dollars & fifty eight
cents; another by Richard Howell thirty four dollars & fifty eight
cents; the four last mentioned lots being situate on Locust street,
opposite the Pottersfield; to hold to him during his natural life, and
after his death to his present eight children or their representatives
and their heirs as tenants in common.  Also I give and devise to my
daughter Loetitia Buchanan the widow of Doctor George Buchanan & to her
heirs & assigns all that body or parcel of land situate on the river
Ohio in Beaver county aforesaid near Logstown, consisting of six
contiguous tracts and containing one thousand five hundred & eighty
acres, and also a plantation or tract of land called Pottersfield,
situate in Hairresís township Penna valley in the now county of Centre
and containing by patent 384 and 154 perches, but actually 407a &
upwards besides an allowance of six per centum for roads & c. which
ought not to be sold for less than forty dollars an acre, being land of
the very first quality; to hold to the said Letitia Buchanan, her heirs
& assigns forever; as I have great confidence she will sell no more than
may be necessary for the maintainance  of herself and children and the
education of the letter; and that she will dispose of the remainder
justly among her children.
 Also I give and devise to Joseph B. McKean, in trust & for the sole use
of Susanna, Mary, Thomas McKean and Anne Buchanan, the four children of
my daughter Anne Buchanan deceased, the following tracts of land, being
part of the depreciation lands, on the north west of the River Ohio, to
wit, a tract in James Cunninghamís district numbered 59 called
Resolution and in William Alexanderís district numbered 100 called
Bordentown, 101 called Independence 133 called New London and number 134
called Borden, all formerly in the county of Alleghany and containing in
the whole about one thousand one hundred and sixteen acres, with the
addition of six per centum for roads & c. and of their heirs & assigns
forever as tenants in common.
 I do further devise in trust as aforesaid for the use of my said four
grand children, the tract of land in Hanover township in the County of
Luzerne, about five miles from Wilksbarre, which I had patented in the
name of their mother Anne, containing four hundred & four acres with the
allowance of six per centum for roads & c. and afterwards sold by the
Commissioners of that county & conveyed to me by the Sheriff in 1807 to
hold to the said Joseph B. McKean in trust for their use as tenants in
common.  And I do further bequeath to the said children of my daughter
Anne the sum of three thousand dollars, to be equally divided between
them and to be paid to them respectively as they severally attain the
age of twenty one years; the interest thereof to commence immediately
after my decease, & to be appropriated to the maintenance & education of
my said Grand-children, or of such of them as shall most need the same,
at the discretion of their Uncle Joseph & Aunt Letitia & the survivor of
them.  Also I do give devise & confirm unto my daughter Sarah Maria
Theresa, Marchiones De casa Yrojo those eight tracts of land situate on
the waters of little Sewickly creek in the township of Ohio and county
of Allegheny in Bradenís district, numbered 107, 108, 109, 110, 111,
112, 114, & 115 and containing two thousand two hundred & sixty six
acres and fifty two perches; to hold to her, her heirs & assigns
forever, besides six acres to every hundred acres additional for roads &
c.  Also I give & devise to my son Thomas McKean all that messuage and
plantation called Chatham, containing three hundred and ninety-two acres
strict measure, of land, with the appurtenances, situate in London grove
township and County of Chester, together with six acres of land growing
Chestnut wood, about three miles westward of the afsd messuage on the
turnpike road leading from thence to Lancaster, which was conveyed to me
by David Kinkrad to hold to him my said son Thomas McKean his heirs and
assigns forever; subject to and charged with an hundred and fifty
dollars annually to my wife and payable in moieties half yearly as
aforesaid.  And I further give and bequeath to my said son Thomas my
silver hilted small sword, my stock, knee & shoe Buckles, silver spurrs
and wearing apparel & appendages to my person together with my folio hot
press Bible.  Also, I give and devise unto my daughter Sophia Dorothea
four tracts of land situate on Bakers mill run in Bal Eagle township and
County of Centre, being on the south side of Susquehanna & about two
miles from the same, containing One thousand six-hundred & eighty four
acres and thirty two Perches besides an allowance of six acres per
centum for roads &c to hold to her and her heirs & assigns forever.  I
do further give & devise to my said daughter Sophia Dorothea two lots of
land situate on the north side of Spruce street between sixth and
seventh streets in the City of Philadelphia, numbered in the plan 5 & 6
being each in width of Spruce Street twenty four feet & nine inches and
in depth North to Locust street two hundred and twenty nine feet which I
have granted in fee, subject to rents charge on ground rents amounting
together to three hundred & fifty eight dollars & eighty seven cents
annually, payable half yearly clear of all taxes &c. with the said
rents-charge and all my estate therein & thereto to hold to her and her
heirs & assigns forever.  I give to my said daughter two thousand
dollars.  Also, I give and devise unto my grandson Samuel Miles McKean
all that plantation called Mount Equity containing about three hundred
acres, with the usual allowance &c. situate in the County of McKean to
hold to him, his heirs & assigns forever.  And I do further give and
devise unto the four children before named of my daughter Ann Buchanan
the rents charge reserved out of lots on the West side of Sixth street
between Locust & Spruce streets in the City of Philadelphia, now held by
Thomas Powell Vizer & John Armstrong, the former being sixty one dollars
& thirty three cents annually and the latter fifty seven dollars & fifty
cents, payable in moities half yearly; to have and to hold to them,
their heirs & assigns forever.  Also I do hereby authorize and impower
my executor hereinafter named & the survivors and survivor of them, or
of such of them as shall take upon themselves or himself the burthen of
the execution of this my will to sell and dispose at public auction or
otherwise for the highest & best prices that can be obtained for the
same in ready money or otherwise all those my messuages, lands,
tenements & hereditaments  following, to wit, about five acres of
meadow, situate on Logan street in Penn township in the County of
Philidelphia near four miles from the city, and a tract of land
containing four hundred and forty acres, adjoining the farm of John
Alston & others, also a messuage & tract of land containing one hundred
& fifty two acres on the Northwest Branch of Duck creek both tracts in
Appoquinimink hundred county of New Castle and State of Delaware, and
all other my real estate not hereby specifically devised; and to execute
deeds or conveyances for all my estate, right, title and interest in the
same to the purchasers, and likewise for such lands as I may sell & not
convey in my lifetime.  I further authorize my executors to sell my
goods and chattels at public auction or otherwise to the best advantage,
except such articles as shall be taken by my wife to the value of one
thousand dollars agreeably to my bequest to her; and I do impower them
to pay all my lawful debts and such as they shall deem just & the
several legacies hereinbefore bequeathed together with a fourth part of
the six hundred dollars a year bequeathed to my wife as aforesaid out of
the produce of my estate real and personal, whether in money, bank stock
public or private securities.  All the rest of my estate real & personal
I give devise & bequeath to my grandchildren Thomas McKean Pettit,
McKean Buchanan, Thomas McKean Buchanan, Charles Ferdinand de Yrujo and
Henry Pratt McKean and their heirs and assigns forever, as tenants in
common.  And lastly I do hereby nominate and appoint my son Joseph B.
McKean my son in law Andrew Pettit & my son Thomas McKean executors of
this my testament & last will, and for their care and pain in the
execution thereof I give & bequeath to every of them two hundred
dollars.  To conclude I appoint & constitute my son Joseph B. guardian
of the children of my daughter Anne deceased and my daughter Loetitia
guardian of her children and my son in law Andrew Pettit guardian of his
children and my son guardian of his son Henry Pratt; to care of direct &
manage the estate & property herein devised and bequeathed to them
respectively until they shall severally arrive at the age of twenty one
years.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day
and year first above written.

        Thos. McKean (      )
 
 

 Children of THOMAS MCKEEN and MARY BORDEN are:
8. i. JOSEPH BORDEN6 MCKEEN, b. 28 July 1764; d. 23 September 1826.
9. ii. ROBERT MCKEEN, b. 09 March 1776; d. 08 June 1802.
 

Generation No. 4

8.  JOSEPH BORDEN6 MCKEEN (THOMAS5, WILLIAM4, WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1) was born 28 July 1764, and died 23 September 1826.  He married HANNAH MILES 13 April 1786, daughter of COL. MILES and CATHERINE WISTER.

 Children of JOSEPH MCKEEN and HANNAH MILES are:
 i. MARY MCKEEN7 MCKEEN.
 ii. CATHERINE MCKEEN.
 iii. SAMUEL MILES MCKEEN.
 iv. THOMAS MCKEEN.
 v. JOSEPHINE KILBRIDE MCKEEN.
 vi. ELIZABETH MCKEEN.
 vii. ANN MCKEEN.
 viii. LETITIA MCKEEN.
 ix. HENRIETTA MCKEEN.
 x. CAROLINE MCKEEN.
 xi. ADELINE JULIA MCKEEN.

9.  ROBERT6 MCKEEN (THOMAS5, WILLIAM4, WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1) was born 09 March 1776, and died 08 June 1802.  He married ANN SMITH 17 April 1794.

 Children of ROBERT MCKEEN and ANN SMITH are:
 i. WILLIAM SMITH7 MCKEEN.
10. ii. MARY MCKEEN.
11. iii. ELIZABETH MCKEEN, b. 18 August.
 

Generation No. 5

10.  MARY7 MCKEEN (ROBERT6, THOMAS5, WILLIAM4, WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1).  She married DAVID HOFFMAN.

 Children of MARY MCKEEN and DAVID HOFFMAN are:
 i. ANNE MCKEEN8 HOFFMAN, d. 05 July 1890.
 ii. ? HOFFMAN.

11.  ELIZABETH7 MCKEEN (ROBERT6, THOMAS5, WILLIAM4, WILLIAM3, JAMES2, WILLIAM1) was born 18 August.  She married ANDREW PETTIT, son of CHARLES PETTIT and SARAH REED.

 Children of ELIZABETH MCKEEN and ANDREW PETTIT are:
 i. THOMAS MCKEEN8 PETTIT.
 ii. THEODOSIA PETTIT, m. BEATON SMITH , M.D..
 iii. ROBERT PETTIT, m. LAURA ELLMAKER.
 

To look through other McKean family archives, click here